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“Red warning lights are flashing on the dashboard of the global economy,” remarked David Cameron last weekend. The Prime Minister was highlighting, rightly, the plethora of economic and geopolitical risks currently stalking the world, all of which threaten the UK’s fragile recovery.

Referring to a “dangerous backdrop of instability and uncertainty”, Cameron pointed to conflicts in the Middle East and Ukraine, ebola, a slowdown among the big emerging economies of the East and, with a flourish, “a eurozone that’s teetering on the brink of a possible third recession”.

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“The final word on quantitative easing will have to wait for historians,” wrote Ambrose Evans-Pritchard last week. Now the US Federal Reserve has apparently ended QE, I’d like to take a cue from my esteemed Telegraph colleague by suggesting what future historians might say.

Last Wednesday, the Fed terminated QE3 – the latest incarnation of its money-creation programme. The American version of this highly unorthodox policy began in late 2008, with the Fed creating virtual balances ex nihilo and purchasing assets such as government debt and mortgage-backed securities, often from bombed-out banks.

The US authorities originally billed QE as a $600bn exercise. By unlocking frozen interbank markets, it was supposed to spur growth, breaking the credit crunch. As meaningful recovery remained elusive, though, QE2 was launched in 2010, with its successor two years later.

In sum, the world’s most important central bank has fired $3,700bn from its monetary bazooka. America’s QE has been six times bigger than envisaged. The Fed’s balance sheet has grew more than three-fold in just over half a decade – an unprecedented monetary expansion. And it’s not just America, of course.
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“When the music stops,” Chuck Prince famously observed back in mid-2007, “things will get complicated”. The then Chief Executive of the US banking giant Citigroup was admitting that growing concerns about sub-prime loans could ultimately shatter what we now know was “irrational exuberance” on global financial markets.

“As long as the music is playing, though, you’ve got to get up and dance,” Prince continued. “And we’re still dancing”. There’s a “we’re still dancing” mood on global markets today, just as there was six years ago, in the run-up to what turned out to be the disastrous market melt-down of September 2008.
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