Archive

Tag Archives: Jens Weidmann

In September 2010, Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega pointed his rhetorical finger at the United States and accused the world’s largest economy of conducting a “currency war”. Suggesting that emerging markets were being unfairly squeezed by a falling dollar, which makes US exports more competitive, Mantega lit the touch paper on a controversy that won’t go away.

For now, “currency wars” are a relatively arcane debate limited to foreign exchange specialists and diplomats. But this issue has already adversely affected hundreds of millions of people who consider themselves largely immune to the vicissitudes of international markets, not least in the UK. History shows, also, such currency disputes can escalate from rhetorical spats into disastrously counter-productive economic conflict.
Read More

European debt and equity markets ended a tumultuous week with a rally on Friday. So shares in the US and across the rest of the world rose too. But the threat of a “euroquake” – a systemic collapse which would make Lehman Brothers look tame – is by no means over. Far from it.

Europe’s leaders don’t know how to solve this crisis because they don’t know what they want. Should attempts be made to hold the eurozone together, with Greece staying in? Or should the threat to expel Athens be followed through, at the risk of causing further defections, with monetary union being reduced to a Franco-German rump? This is an enormous question, which only Germany can answer. Until an answer is forthcoming, chaos will continue to ensue.
Read More